Courses

photo of a sign in multiple languages that says, "We who love the revolution."

"We who love the revolution." International Conference on Dilemmas of Humanity at the MST's Escola Nacional Florestan Fernandes in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Photo by Dylani Shea, 2015.


All courses are graduate-level courses that support program objectives. Core courses provide students with a full range of conceptual and methodological tools. DVST elective courses are designed to complement and expand the program’s core curriculum. Out of program electives are drawn from other York graduate programs for their thematic relevance to the field of development studies and are available to DVST students depending on availability and demand.

Students wishing to take an elective outside the program must fill out the form "Request to take courses in another Graduate program at York" and obtain written permission of the Development Studies Program Director.

Core Courses

Students will take all four core courses. DVST 5122 3.0 will be taken in second year.

DVST 5100 3.0 Conceptual Foundations of Development (Fall)

This course examines the epistemological foundations of development from a critical interdisciplinary perspective. It focuses on the key theoretical approaches that influenced the evolution of the discipline and on the historical forces that shaped development as a field of study. The course enables reflection on prevalent development practices through an analysis of the shifting frontiers of development.

DVST 5101 3.0 Historical and Institutional Foundations of Development (Fall)

This course traces the evolution of development theory and practice through critical reflection on the main models of economic and human development in the field. It assesses competing claims about the causes, consequences of, and obstacles to, development, by focusing on quantitative and non-quantitative variables, including non-mathematical models of economic growth, changes in institutional and organizational practices, and cultural factors.

DVST 5120 3.0 Research Methods for Development (Winter)

This interdisciplinary course will provide a basis for research on and in developing countries, giving students an appreciation of the range of competing theoretical and methodological frameworks which inform research in international development.

DVST 5122 3.0 Critical Reflections on Field Work (Fall - second-year students only)

Drawing from participatory action research models, this course aims to help class-members critically review the data collected and/or experiences gathered from the field. It highlights the potential contradiction between a researcher's agenda and findings and the lack of usefulness or relevance the information/data/insights have for primary beneficiaries, stakeholders, and local people.

Development Studies Elective Courses

Three electives will be drawn from the following courses:

DVST 5110 3.0 Development, Political Economy & Policy (Winter)

The course explores major contributions to the study of global political economy in order to account for the political determinants, and also the consequences, of international economic relations. The focus is on the origins and evolution of the modern world system, including globalization and its impact on structures of power.

DVST 5111 3.0 Civil Society in Development Discourse and Practice (Fall)

This course examines the changing roles of civil society in development. It critically reviews the main theoretical and practical approaches to civil society, highlighting their normative assumptions regarding its potential contribution to development and democracy as well as their practical consequences. It explores the usefulness of the concept of civil society to capture the complexity and diversity of associational life across the Global South.

DVST 5112 3.0 Cultural Politics of Development 

This course brings together cultural theory and development theory and practice to explore the ways that development processes have changed the social and cultural makeup of countries and communities, and to investigate the salience of the connections between representation, power and culture in development practice. The course also examines the changing uses to which culture has been put by development institutions as an instrument of and for development.

Not Offered in 2017-18.

DVST 5121 3.0 Tools & Policy Analysis for Development (Winter)

This course offers a comprehensive, yet critical overview of the ways in which development is delivered by official aid agencies, government organizations and NGOs. By exploring selected case studies, it aims to provide a balanced analysis of the effectiveness of commonly used tools that aim to promote people–centered development in different parts of the world. The course creates an opportunity for students to break new intellectual ground in the delivery of development in the new millennium.

DVST 5123 3.0 Forced Migration and Refugee Issues (Summer)

This course examines contemporary issues related to refugee and forced migration movements from a critical development studies perspective. Drawing on Canadian and international academic and field-based experts, the course explores political, economic, social and cultural contexts of forced migration.

DVST 5124 3.0 The Global Sex Trade (Fall)

This course introduces the main theories and perspectives on the sex trade, and reviews historical and contemporary debates surrounding cross-border movements that have been identified as 'the traffic in women' and 'sex trafficking.'

Not Offered in 2017-18.

DVST 5125 3.0 Feminism in Black Africa (Winter)

The purpose of this course is to explore contemporary African feminism/s and to engage in critical conversation with it. Some of the key issues on the continent and in the diaspora are examined through the feminist intersectional lens.

Same as Women’s Studies 6225 3.0.

 

DVST 5126 3.0  The Business of Fair Trade and Development (Fall)

This integrated seminar course [i.e. for graduate and undergraduate students] is designed to allow students to explore a particular issue in the intersection of business and society, and development: Fair Trade. The course focuses on the various aspects of fair trade practice– as a form of regulation, as a form of production, as a social movement, and as a development model.

Same as SOSC 4048 3.0.

Out-of-Program Elective Courses

Students can take one out-of-program elective course.

Please check home-program websites for out-of-program elective courses to confirm their availability and timetable.

Anthropology

ANTH 5135 3.0 Globalization and Cultural Identities

This course explores globalization and its influence on the construction of cultural identities, addressing the contested term and its impact on nations, institutions, and peoples as they experience in local situations spatial and temporal transformations produced in discourses, images, and actions resulting from this process.

Same as CMCT 6311 3.0 and SPTH 6212 3.0.
Not Offered in 2017-18.


ANTH 5145 3.0 Critical Approaches to Gender, Displacement and Mobility (Fall)

This course examines anthropological thought related to gender, forced migration and displacement from political, economic, social and cultural perspectives; includes critical feminist, diasporic anthropological theories, critiques of resettlement, humanitarianism and a political economy approach to the study of displacement.


ANTH 5175 3.0 Discourses of Race and Racist Discourse (Winter)

Paradoxically, while the social meanings attached to "race" are recognized as groundless, race persists in defining and confining identities, facilitating social cohesion, and making subjectivies that transcend time and space. The focus on discourse in this course explores this paradox. We examine connections between language and different form of knowledge - of culture, History, Anthropology - in making and sustaining race. We consider how discourses of identity and difference, culture and nature, converge with discourses of the body in multiple representations to make race, like gender, one of the most naturalized discourses of our time.


ANTH 5190 3.0 Cultural Politics of Environment and Development II: Environmental Justice

This course focuses on environmental movements and social justice in the context of both northern and southern settings. It draws on cultural studies, political economy, and the geography of space to explore questions of identity, justice and violence.

Same as GEOG 5325 3.0, SOCI 6315 3.0.
Not Offered in 2017-18.


ANTH 5195 3.0 Matters of Nature: Theories and Politics of Social Natures

This course critically engages with the vast and growing body of work anthropology, geography, and science studies that addresses the discursive and material contours of society-nature relations in historically situated and geographically diverse sites.

Same as GEOG 5327 3.0.


ANTH 5225 3.0 Global Health (Fall)

This course explores global health issues in social, cultural and political context and delves into the development and humanitarian logics that underpin policies and programs to address them. Anthropological research on global health encompases colonial and missionary medicine, humanitarian medicine, inequities in the distribution of health resources (including science, technology and clinical care), and global health agencies and policies.


ANTH 5130 3.0 Issues in Medical Anthropology

This course provides an intensive, critical analysis of recent work in medical anthropology, with particular emphasis on the social construction of biomedical knowledge. Current themes also include international health, gender and science, and the contextualization of both the body and medicine in various cross cultural domains.

Not Offered in 2017-18.


ANTH 5500 3.00 The Making of Asian Studies: Critical Perspectives (Winter)

This course offers a historical examination of the multiple, overlapping processes through which Asian identities and regions were constituted. It will also examine new directions in Asian studies in an era of intensified global flows, transnationalism, and the presence of Asian diaspora in Canada and elsewhere.

Same as GEOG 5700 3.00, SOCI 6745 3.00, HUMA 6135 3.00, HIST 5480 3.00.


Economics

GS/ECON 5910 3.00 Trade Policy and Economic Integration

Course Description: TBA. Instructor: Ricardo Grinspun

(Crosslisted to: SPTH 6026 3.00)


Education

EDUC 5421 3.00 Discourses of Race and Racist Discourse (Winter)

This seminar works with an understanding of race as a complex set of social meanings, that are being constantly transformed.  It explores the relationships between discourses of race and discourses of identity and culture.  It examines how race converges with discourses of nation, class, gender, colonialism and the postcolonial.

Same as ANTH 5715 and FILM 5320L.


EDUC 5464 3.0 Issues in Globalization and Education (Fall)

This course inquires broadly into notions of globalization from the perspective of education. It examines the antecedents of globalization, the emerging processes of globalization and conceptual resources for understanding the impact of globalization on educational policy and practice.


EDUC 5930 3.00 Engaged Scholarship: Using Knowledge Mobilization to bridge the gap between academia, policy and practice. (Winter)

Knowledge Mobilization consists of innovative theory and strategies to enhance the creation and impact of research. This advanced seminar examines theories, provides practical skills and creates the opportunity to learn from practitioners.

Not Offered in 2017-18.


Environmental Studies

ENVS 5011 3.00 Food, Land, and Culture (Winter)

This course examines food, land, and culture from a critical interdisciplinary environmental perspective. Students have the opportunity to pursue their own interests related to food politics, planning, sustainable and alternative agriculture, human-animal relationships and ethics, from a local and or global perspective.

Not Offered in 2017-18.

ENVS 5023 3.00 Global Cities (Winter)

This course offers an introduction to the literature on global cities and a systematic review of a distinct field of research in urban studies which concerns itself with the globalization of a network of global or world cities.

Same as GEOG 5580 3.0.


ENVS 5070 3.00 Extraction and its Discontents: A Social History and Political Economy (Fall)

This course examines current political, economic and social debates concerning extractive industry, placing these in the context of longer histories of global imperialism and colonialism. Following a review of conceptual approaches to natural resource `extraction`, the course will examine contemporary global regulation and resistance to it, focusing upon the state, the corporation, the resource, the affected community, and the (global) social movement as units of analysis.

Not Offered in 2017-18.


ENVS 5103 3.00 Nature and Society (Fall)

Examination of conceptions of nature found in the Western tradition. A particular emphasis is placed on the role of cultural narratives, and notions of technology and time in shaping our conceptions of nature.


ENVS 5106 3.00   Critical Perspectives on Race, Gender and Environment (Fall)

Overview of the basic concepts and approaches of feminist analysis, with particular attention to feminist theory and its relevance to environmental issues. The course also examines gender, i.e. hierarchical distinctions between male and female, and conforming or non-conforming genders and sexualities, in its intersections with racism, capitalism and colonialism.


ENVS 5124 3.00   Development and Global Inequalities (Fall)

Survey of the evolution of development theory over the past three decades. Economic, social, political, and environmental ideas are discussed in relation to the process of development in both northern Canada and the Third World.


ENVS 5475 3.00   Space, Place and Capitalism: Themes in Historical-Geographical Materialism (Fall)

This course examines the political economy of capitalism from a geographical angle. It looks at the spatial and environmental aspects of capitalism employing Marx's 'mature' works as well as more contemporary literature on political economy in geography and cultural studies.

(Crosslisted to: GS/SOCI 6794 3.00)


ENVS 6117 3.00 Ecologies and Sustainability in the Global South (Fall)

This course takes ecological (or systemic) approaches from diverse epistemologies to aid in the critical exploration of conservation, resource management, sustainable development and social justice issues in the Global South. The focus of the course is directed at discerning the complex factors that contribute to environmental degradation and social injustice, and at evaluating options that address these problems in search of improved social and environmental well-being.


ENVS 6152 3.00 Reshaping Research with Aboriginal Peoples (Fall)

This course looks at current and historical research from Aboriginal and Indigenous (non-western) perspectives, including ethics, epistemologies, methodologies, protocols, and practices. It also examines colonial and 'post' colonial research practices by mainstream researchers, publishers, granting agencies, and ethics review boards.


ENVS 6156 3.00   Critical Theory of International Development (Fall)

 Study of theories of development, underdevelopment and maldevelopment in Third World Countries, with stress on the social, economic, political, ideological and ecological bases for development approaches. Historical and current approaches to the theory of development are presented, and the extent to which they respond to environmental concerns is investigated.


Gender, Feminist And Women's Studies

GFWS 6133 3.00 Gender and International Human Rights: Law, Citizenships and Borders (Winter)

This course introduces students to the structure and the main mechanisms of international human rights law and its impact on women and gender relations. The focus of the course is on the United Nations, its agencies, and its system of international Conventions and Declarations designed to increase gender equality.

Same as SLST 6055 3.00, POLS 6705 3.00.

Not offered in 2017-18.


GFWS 6225 3.00   Feminism in Black Africa (Winter)

The purpose of this course is to explore contemporary African feminism/s and to engage in critical conversation with it. Some of the key issues on the continent and in the diaspora are examined through the feminist intersectional lens.


GFWS 6905 3.00   Race, Transnationalism & Diaspora (Winter)

The course examines studies of transnationalism and diaspora through a critical race perspective. Through a critical, interdisciplinary and relational approach the course will especially explore debates about race, transnationalism and diaspora in feminist, postcolonial, sexuality and queer studies.


Geography

GEOG 5326 3.0 Critical Political Ecologies (Winter)

This course explores how power and knowledge shape intertwined social and ecological relationships, drawing on theoretically-informed ethnographies and other empirical studies, with an emphasis on global south research.

Same as ANTH 5030 3.0.
Not offered in 2017-18.


GEOG 5327 3.0 Matters of Nature: Theories and Politics of Social Natures (Winter)

This course critically engages with the vast and growing body of work in anthropology, geography, and science studies that addresses the discursive and material contours of society –nature relations in historically situated and geographically diverse sites.

Same as ANTH 5195 3.0.


GEOG 5330 3.0 Feminist Geographies of Space and Place

This course examines developments in feminist geography over the last two decades. Particular attention will be given to studies of the construction and representation of gendered identities in specific places as well as the role of place in the constitution of those identities.

Same as GFWS 6901 3.0.
Not offered in 2017-18.


GEOG 5355 3.0 Seminar in Political Geography: Spaces of Power and the Politics of Space (Fall)

This interdisciplinary seminar examines contemporary themes in political geography, focusing on the ways in which power and political processes are both shaped by and shape particular spaces, scales, networks, and other spatial relations. We will approach these issues through the lens of violence. In particular, we will examine the ways in which violence and power relations both emerge from and reshape particular spatial relations (such as territorial boundaries and access to environmental resources) and the ways in which goods, capital, and people move across and create spaces of violence. Course themes include territory and territoriality, environment and development, extractive economies (e.g., oil and diamonds), biopower and sites of surveillance, spaces of terror and the politics of fear, and the politics of human mobility.


GEOG 5360 3.0 Geographies of Globalization and Development

This course examines the ways in which developing areas are being integrated into a globalizing world economy. The course explores: the discursive power of globalization and development as concepts; the flows of commodities, capital and people that integrate global space; and, the multiple scales at which the global economy is constituted.

Not offered in 2017-18.


GEOG 5375 3.0 Space, Place and Capitalism: Themes in Historical-Geographical Materialism (Fall)

This course examines the political economy of capitalism from a geographical angle. It looks at the spatial and environmental aspects of capitalism employing Marx’s ‘mature’ works as well as more contemporary literature on political economy in geography and cultural studies. Same as ENVS 5475 3.0.

Same as ENVS 5475 3.0.


GEOG 5580 3.0 Global Cities (Winter)

This course offers an introduc¬tion to the literature on global cities and a systematic review of a distinct field of research in urban studies which concerns itself with the globalization of a network of global or world cities. Same as ENVS 5023 3.0.

GEOG 5700 3.00   The Making of Asian Studies: Critical Perspectives (Winter)

This course offers a historical examination of the multiple, overlapping processes through which Asian identities and regions were constituted. It will also examine new directions in Asian studies in an era of intensified global flows, transnationalism, and the presence of Asian diaspora in Canada and elsewhere.

(Crosslisted to: GS/SOCI 6745 3.00, GS/ANTH 5500 3.00, GS/HUMA 6135 3.00, GS/CMCT 6136 3.00, GS/HIST 5480 3.00)


Health

HLTH 5030 3.00 Health and Politics (Winter)

Considers how social relations involving authority or power influence the domain of health studies. It focuses on three key areas: paradigms of health, the determinants of population health, and the forces that influence the organization and delivery of health care.


HLTH 6210 3.00   The Political Economy of Health Inequities (Fall)

Considers how the political and economic forces that shape the distribution of wealth, influence, and power within wealthy developed nations such as Canada create health inequities. The course focuses on three key areas related to the presence of health inequities: the economic system, the political system, and the ability of citizens to shape public policy.


HLTH 6220 3.00 Human rights and Health Equity (Fall)

This course considers health from a human rights and social justice perspective, exploring both domestic and international issues. It focuses on three areas: disability, reproductive technology and HIV/AIDS.

Not offered in 2017-18.


History

HIST 5480 3.00   The Making of Asian Studies: Critical Perspectives (Winter)

This course offers a historical examination of the multiple, overlapping processes through which Asian identities and regions were constituted. It will also examine new directions in Asian studies in an era of intensified global flows, transnationalism, and the presence of Asian diaspora in Canada and elsewhere.

(Crosslisted to: GS/GEOG 5700 3.00, GS/SOCI 6745 3.00, GS/ANTH 5500 3.00, GS/HUMA 6135 3.00, GS/CMCT 6136 3.00)


HIST 5490 3.00   PostColonial State Formations in East and South Asia: A Comparative and Theoretical Review (Winter)

This seminar critically evaluates theories and histories of postcolonial state formations in East and South Asia.


HIST 5590 3.00 Transnational and Global Histories (Fall)

This course examines transnational historical processes and events, focusing on temporal and geographic scales outside of traditional national histories, and on linking the local and the global. It considers how global forces affect societies, and problematizes core historical assumptions

Not offered in 2017-18.


HIST 5770 3.00 Languages, Empires, and Nations (Winter)

This course explores the history of ideologies and policies concerning languages and their relation to society in Europe and its colonies since the fifteenth century. The course examines the linguistic policies of early modern and modern colonial empires, the rise of linguistic nationalism, and the broad implications of changing forms of linguistic knowledge.

Not offered in 2017-18.


HIST 5900 3.00 Themes in Post-Emancipation Caribbean History (Fall)

This course is an examination of selected themes in the social and cultural history of the Caribbean from 1804 to circa 1968. It is pan-Caribbean in perspective but with an emphasis on the Anglo-Caribbean. Among the themes discussed are the development of educational systems; crime, law, and public order; family patterns and gender relations; indentured life; popular festivals, sports and recreation; religion; rural and urban living.

Not offered in 2017-18.


HIST 5903 3.00 The History of Africa (Winter)

This course examines major themes in the Historiography of Africa, taking account of change over time and variations based on sources

Not offered in 2017-18.


HIST 5960 3.00 Social History of Commodities (Winter)

This class explores the historiography of a commodity: the production, distribution, and consumption of goods such as sugar, bananas, alcohol, copper, or coffee. The commodity to be studied varies according to the interests of the course director and the needs of the students.


Political Science

POLS 5245 3.00 Gender and International Relations (Winter)

This course explores both the theoretical and empirical issues raised by the introduction of a consideration of "gender" in international relations. Issues covered include gender and the environment, militarism, human rights, international political economy and so on. Integrated with the undergraduate course Political Science 4245.03.

Same as GFWS 6118 3.00.
Not offered in 2017-18.


POLS 5404 3.00 Politics and Cultures of Neoliberal Urbanism (Fall)

This course examines the origins and historical development of neoliberalism as a political ideology of municipal governments, and the impacts of neoliberal policies on social/political/cultural relations in contemporary cities. Students also analyze theoretical and political debates surrounding neoliberal urbanism.

Not offered in 2017-18.


POLS 5450 3.00 Political Economy and Political Power (Fall)

This course offers a critical understanding of political power. It discusses the meaning and origin of power, its intertwining with the social division of labor, its relationship to economic and ideological power. Further, the course offers a critical analysis of the state, political processes, leadership, and the establishment of consensus. It then discusses the conditions and implications of democracy.

Not offered in 2017-18.


POLS 5555 3.00 Latin American Development (Winter)

The course examines relationships between development policy choices, ideologies of progress, and forms of political domination, with the latter analysed with reference to social structures. The treatment of general Latin American patterns is complemented by studies of specific countries.

Not offered in 2017-18.


POLS 5575 3.0 The Politics of Southern Africa

This course examines South Africa’s racial capitalist system and resistance to it — focusing on the present transition to a more equitable political and economic system; it also explores the current situation in other southern African countries (Angola, Mozambique, Namibia, and Zimbabwe).

Not offered in 2017-18.


POLS 5590 3.0 Political Development in India

A survey of political development in contemporary India. Topics include the transformation from colony to independence, and challenges to the liberal-democratic system by caste, communalism, regionalism and communism.

Not offered in 2017-18.


POLS 6145 3.00 Indigenous Politics: Decolonization or "Development"?* (Fall)

This course explores indigeous development experiences in Canada and throughout the world, in comparative perspective. It draws on theories of development and underdevelopment and examines the sociology, politics and economics of development as well as environmental and cultural implications.


POLS 6205 3.00 Hegemony, Imperialism and Globalization (Fall)

This course analyzes theories and concepts of power, supremacy, hegemony and imperialism in different world orders since antiquity. Analytical emphasis is placed on explaining the post-1945 period associated with American hegemony, Soviet Power and subsequent patterns of intensified globalization.


POLS 6245 3.00 The Global Politics of Health (Fall)

This course examines health at the intersection between global and national political terrains. It explores the impact of extensive biomedical development, national competition, and international trade on both the reality and delivery of health for populations.

Not offered in 2017-18.


POLS 6250 3.00   Neoliberalism (Fall)

This course examines the theories, practices, implicit rationalities, and tensions/contradictions of neoliberalism.


POLS 6265 3.00 Post-Colonial Theory and IR (Fall)

One of the past century’s most profound transformations was decolonization: the end of direct European rule over vast areas of the earth. The worlds of cultural and political analysis have both contributed and responded to this shift, producing a significant body of writings we name colonial and postcolonial critique. The emergence of postcolonial theory rests on the idea of coming after colonialism. Colonialism though does not necessarily end with the end of colonial occupation. This course traces the emergence of postcolonial theory, its relationship to IR by focusing on a set of questions spatial, economic and political experience of colonial occupation raises for modern liberal and neo-liberal laws and legal regimes.


POLS 6515 3.00 The Making of the Modern Middle East: Politics, States and Societies (Winter)

This is a comprehensive graduate seminar about the Making and Re-making of the Middle East, of its politics and economy, its multiple histories (imperialism, colonialism, class, gender, state etc.), ideological discourses and practices (nationalism, socialism, communism etc.). The course will familiarize graduate students with theoretical, historical, and methodological issues that are of relevance to the study of Middle East Politics and Economy. The complexity, contradictory nature, and multilayered make-up of the subject - the concepts, over different histories up to specific topics and current multiple developments - makes a multidisciplinary approach compulsory. We will approach these issues in the context of various disciplines: comparative politics and International Relations, (international) political economy, state theory, political thought, ideology critique, and discourse analysis.


POLS 6525 3.00   Diasporas: Transnational Communities and Limits of Citizenship (Winter)

This course provides a comparative inquiry about the nature of transnational communal, religious, and political identities at the age of late capitalism. It puts emphasis on critical approaches to diasporas, their variant constructions of homeland and home, and their marked effects on the politics of the post-Westphalian state and international relations.


POLS 6566 3.00W Advanced Topics in Latin American and Caribbean Politics (Winter)

This course examines the impact of international economic integration on Latin America and the Caribbean. It focuses on the social impact of globalization and the responses that these changes call forth: state policies, the rise of new political parties, unions and grassroots organizations and, in particular, international migration and transnationalism.

Same as SPTH 6305 3.0.


POLS 6570 3.00 Advanced Topics in the Politics of the Third World: The State, Society and Democracy in the Underdeveloped South  (Fall)

This course seeks both to theorize and to examine empirically the interactions between the state, society (class, race, religion, gender, nation, ethnic) and the global economy in a range of “Third World” settings, highlighting questions of development, equity and democracy.


POLS 6625 3.00 The Political Economy of the BRICS (Winter)

This course examines the rise of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa - euphemistically called the BRICS - in the context of the shifting international order. The focus is on analyzing the political-economic and diplomatic development of these countries in comparative and global perspective.

Not offered in 2017-18.


POLS 6750 3.00   Gender and the Construction of Global Markets (Fall)

(Crosslisted to: GS/WMST 6113 3.00, GS/GFWS 6113 3.00)

No course Description


Socio-Legal Studies

SLST 6028 3.0: Neoliberalism: Governmentality in Theory and Practice

What is neoliberalism? The word is everywhere, but what does it mean? Is it just a new word for capitalism or does it indicate a specific kind of capitalism? This course will start with the proposition that neoliberalism involves a fundamental reconfiguration of the field of regulation that entails a reengineering of the state and a transnational field of market-oriented 'regulatory transfer'. Regulation is shaped by law and state initiatives, but it is also "a social activity that includes persuasion, influence, voluntary compliance and self-regulation" (Braithwaite 2006: 19). This is especially the case under contemporary conditions of neoliberal 'governmentality', in which non-state actors (international institutions, NGOs, public-private partnerships, religious institutions, and corporations) increasingly engage in activities which govern populations and encourage people to adopt new forms of self-regulation.

Not offered in 2017-18.


SLST 6055 3.00 Gender and International Human Rights: Law, Citizenships and Borders (Winter)

This course introduces students to the structure and the main mechanisms of international human rights law and its impact on women and gender relations. The focus of the course is on the United Nations, its agencies, and its system of international Conventions and Declarations designed to increase gender equality.

Same as GFWS 6133 3.00, POLS 6705 3.00.

Not offered in 2017-18.


SLST 6065 3.00   Colonialism, Race and the Law: Sociological Implications (Fall)

The objective of this course is to provide students with theoretical and methodological tools to critically examine and explore how race and processes of racialization are constituted, exercised, lived and contested in law, through law and by law. This course examines the relationship between race, colonization and the contemporary legal order. The course will address the intersections of law, modernity and liberalism in order to address the role that law plays in the constitution of racialized, gendered and classed subjects. The course will address how legal processes of racialization contribute to the politics of nation-building and to the development of national subjectivities.

(Crosslisted to: GS/SOCI 6893 3.00, GS/SPTH 6146 3.00)


Sociology

SOCI 6200 3.0A Contemporary Topics in Social Theory: Postcolonial and Third World Feminisms

Course Director: Sylvia Bawa
This course will provide a platform for exploring postcolonial and third world feminisms in their varied iterations. Mindful of the tenuous reception of feminism in the third world, the course aims to examine the contributions of third world feminisms to understanding paradoxes in the postcolonial world and how these inform social justice activism for women’s rights and empowerment. Thus, participants in the course will examine the ways in which postcolonial feminisms engage orthodox discourses on globalization, development and gender. Some themes to be explored are: tensions in the constructions of gender and identity in the postcolonial nation state; global rights and women’s individual rights discourses and culture in ‘developing countries’.


SOCI 6312 3.00 Critical Political Ecologies

This course explores how power and knowledge shape intertwined social and ecological relationships, drawing on theoretically-informed ethnographies and other empirical studies, with an emphasis on global south research.

Same as GEOG 5326 3.00, ANTH 5030 3.00)
Not offered in 2017-18.


SOCI 6614 3.00 Migration and Transnationalisms (Winter)

Cross-border movements of people, capital, goods, and ideas raise challenging theoretical, methodological and policy questions about the social, political, economic and cultural organization of life lived in multiple national contexts. This course will explore social, economic, cultural, and political transnational processes. Topics may include: nation-building and membership, theories of migration and incorporation, transnationalism, diasporas, citizenship and legal status, racialization, identity, gender, remittances, second generation, and cross-border political participation.

Not offered in 2017-18.


SOCI 6660 3.0 Sociology of Global Development

The study of development has been one the driving forces behind the discipline of sociology since its inception. However, the meaning of development remains an open debate. This course will consider the various dimensions of development from an international perspective: development as economic, social and political transformation, as progress, as freedom, as Western ideology, as domination and as an industry. The course will also explore current debates in the field surrounding the roles of colonial legacies and states in shaping modern development.

Not offered in 2017-18.


SOCI 6664 3.00 Economic Sociology (Fall)

This course explores various sociological analyses of economic processes and economic phenomena. It considers the extent to which the social shapes economic activity and influences economic values. Conversely, it examines the ways in which economic forces shape social structures.

Not offered in 2016-17.


SOCI 6794 3.00   Space, Place and Capitalism: Themes in Historical-Geographical Materialism (Fall)

This course examines the political economy of capitalism from a geographical angle. It looks at the spatial and environmental aspects of capitalism employing Marx's 'mature' works as well as more contemporary literature on political economy in geography and cultural studies.

(Crosslisted to: GS/GEOG 5375 3.00, ES/ENVS 5475 3.00, GS/ENVS 5475 3.00)


Social Work

SOWK 5030 3.00 Oppression and Intersectionality (Fall)

This course examines the interlocking nature of oppression, including colonial and state oppression of Aboriginal people. Questions of identity, subjectivity, and representation will be examined to move toward understanding practices of resistance and transformation.


SOWK 5930 3.00 Critical International Social Work (Winter)

This course provides advanced contexts to critically examine international issues from local and global perspectives. It focuses on analyses of race, space, identity, nationalism and professional imperialism in the current context of globalization, development and international social work.


SOWK 5995 3.00 Advanced Seminar on Social Work with Immigrants, Refugees and Diaspora: Local and Global Communities (Fall)

This course addresses impacts of migration on individuals, communities and families. It examines theories and discourses of migration and diaspora, Canadian immigration policy, and social service issues related to immigrants, refugees and diaspora.